Friday, November 14, 2014

Is lack of time making us vulnerable to scams?

"In my day..." is something I hear a lot of from very old people and the sentence usually ends with something that the very old people had that we as a society no longer have and one of those things is TIME. Time has become a commodity, a resource that many of us just don't have. We now work longer hours, chauffeur our kids to and from numerous parties and activities, keep up with social media and so on. And we commute to and from work.  And despite the fact that we are have less time, the world is getting more complicated.  Once upon a time, you might have come across a skilled scammer, someone who could 'sell ice to Eskimos', someone who would make you buy something for way more money than it was worth.  That scammer had to knock on your door or intercept you somehow to offer you this deal and this was a precarious work for the scammer as they would have to invest their time, which may or may not pay off. 

But now, you only have to log on to your email to encounter numerous scammers that are out to get you in the moment of irrationality, moment of weakness, that moment of wandering attention.  And they don't need to invest a lot of time to do it.  In other words, scammers have managed to cut the time it takes them to scam you and we have less time to evaluate offers and information we are presented with.  If you are buying something online you probably have to wade through lengthy terms and conditions that take an hour to read, generous updates to existing terms and conditions that you have already read and absorbed (such as PayPal updates) so on. Often there is just not enough time and this lack of time makes us vulnerable to scams.  Often, investing just a bit more time into looking for clues of authenticity in an email or a website can make us suspicious.  But time has become like a currency.  Because sometimes it is in short supply, some people report making rational decisions to risk money in certain situations where they are not completely sure that the website is legitimate.  In other words, they feel the time they would have to invest to read all the information out there is not worth the amount they are spending. 


This fact is known to scammers who often inundate their websites with information, making you more likely to engage in peripheral route of processing (skimming rather than reading carefully and thinking about the information). And many keep the amount low enough to make it insignificant to you so you will not spend too much time evaluating the information.  

Often, companies engaging, shall we say in shady or unethical practices, use this tactic. The small print is out there but there is so much to read that it is lost somewhere in other persuasive methods, such as testimonials from people (often fake), shiny graphics and useless scientific data that is rarely followed up by the buyer and often not even correct.  How many of us have the time to Google the ingredients to that slimming product, or that magic anti ageing cream or a miracle cure for cancer?  But if we did invest the time to gain the relevant knowledge, we would find that often this would be enough to save us from being scammed by these companies.  The same goes for real scammers, the people who will take your money and not give you anything for that, i.e. they will just run away with your money, change the website and scam another person tomorrow. 


There is no easy advice here.  Optimally, all of us would be motivated enough to want to read and know as much as we can about things that go on in our lives but sometimes that motivation is just not there.  And time seems to be one reason for that.  But that extra half an hour verifying information you are reading might just save you some money in the end. 









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